New series begins this weekend!

Are you ready for miracles, Promisors?

This weekend we begin our Heart for the Harvest season, where we prepare for New Rivers and New Roads of God’s provision in our lives, restoration in our relationships, and healing in our families.

During this season (October 22-November 11), I invite you, your family, and your group to pray and fast for a movement like we have never seen before across all our campuses. I’m praying that God would send miracles so powerful that only He will receive the glory, honor, and praise!

We will also share of the new initiatives for exponential growth at Faith Promise here in Tennessee and what new projects around the world will be accomplished through your sacrificial obedience and generosity.

Revival is available, and miracles are sure to follow. What will your part in the miracle be this Heart for the Harvest?

Love you, and see you this weekend!

Pastor

And don’t forget that our all-new Next Steps is now in full swing. Sign up here, or show-up at 11:30 am at your campus (Pellissippi campus has an additional offering on Saturdays at 6:15 pm).

Revival Week 4 – Discussion Guide

Getting Started

Main Idea: Thanks to God’s will and initiation, revival is available to everyone.

Discussion Starter: Discuss a time when you learned from a mistake.

Introduction: This week Pastor Zac showed us the progression of revival and how revival is available to everyone through God’s will.

Watch this brief intro together with your group (click picture below):

Encounter God

Primary Scriptures: John 3:16, 2 Chronicles 7:14, Proverbs 14:22, Hebrews 12:4-11, Luke 15:20-23, Romans 6:23, Psalm 51:12

Discussion Questions:

1. Pastor Zac quoted Henry Blackaby, who said, “Revival is a divinely initiated work in which God’s people pray, repent of their sin, and return to a holy, Spirit-filled, obedient love relationship with God.”  Restate this definition in your own words.

2.  Why is it important that God is the One who initiates revival?

3. There is a difference between discipline and punishment.  Discipline is used to train, whereas punishment is a penalty for an offense.  Read Hebrews 12:4-11.  How has God disciplined you in the past or currently?  Did you respond with appreciation?

4.  In Progression 4, Pastor Zac points out that we cry out to God.  Read Psalm 61:1-4.  Why is being humble an essential element of crying out to God?  Can you genuinely cry out to God while being prideful?

5. What is your biggest obstacle to moving from a “what if” revival is available mindset and life, to an “as if” one?

Discovery Bible Method:
For deeper study, as an alternative to the questions above, read Proverbs 14:22 and use the Discovery Bible Method to explore the passage.


Embrace Others

Suggestion: Consider breaking the group into dyads or triads for this section.

Getting to know you:  How can those in your group help you identify where you are on the revival progression?

Getting to know them: How can your group help each other take their next step in the revival progression?

Getting to know Him:  Read Philippians 1:6.  Take some time and reflect on how God started His work in you.


Engage the World Around Us

Engaging at Faith Promise:  Since it is Pastor Appreciation Month, reach out and encourage a pastor at your campus this week.

Engaging in Community:  Undoubtedly, God wants to bring revival to all of our communities.  Where is your place in being a part of revival in your community?

Engaging the World: God’s Kingdom is expanding all over the world.  How are you partnering with Christians around the world to see global revival?


Expand God’s Kingdom

This week, read James 5:7-11 with someone you are helping disciple and discuss how each of you can grow in your walk with Christ.


Leader’s Notes

ALL groups at Faith Promise should follow Jesus Christ and lead others to do the same. Below are the marks of a growing follower and disciple of Jesus.

– A follower of Jesus desires to encounter God through the deeper study and application of God’s Word.

– A follower of Jesus embraces people and values relationships on a deeper level so everyone can grow together.

– A follower of Jesus engages and serves the world around them and in their community, through local partners or God-directed opportunities.

– A follower of Jesus expands God’s Kingdom through development and multiplication of disciple-makers, possibly to lead more groups at Faith Promise.

Back to School

While the rain had put a damper on some of our activities, it has also opened up some opportunities that we have not had in the past.

Monday we started out visiting Dexia school. When we have visited in the past, there were five small classrooms with 20 to 40 students per room, and we got to spend about 5 to 10 minutes in each. Today, because of the rain, there were only about 25 students total, all in one classroom. We got to spend quite a bit of time with them, and got to give them a lot more individual attention. In the photo above, the children were singing Happy Birthday Josie, who celebrated her 16th birthday today.

After Dexia, we headed to Bambou. When we got there the school was closed. Instead of being disappointed, we toured the school, and probably got a better opportunity to get a feel for the size and lighting issues that they deal with.

And as if they had not impressed me enough, we went out back to find the students who have come on the trip with us praying over the school. Can’t wait to see the impact these young people are going to have on their own schools when they get home and share their experiences.

Since we usually attract attention everywhere we go, many local Haitians came to see what we were doing, and we ended up gathering all together and praying for the school together.

Then Tonja and I got to spend a few minutes talking to Charles, the Haitian child that we sponsor through 410 Bridge. He has grown so much since we first met him. If you are looking for a way you can make a big impact, child sponsorship not only changes that child’s life, but has a ripple effect through all the people that child will some day impact. In addition, when a school gets enough children sponsored, then there is also a benefit to the rest of the school as programs will be implemented for all the classrooms.

They say a picture is worth a thousand words. I stopped counting at around 160 kids when we visited Reno in the afternoon. And once again, the team impressed me with their willingness to jump into the chaos. If you look closely, you will find them scattered throughout all of the children.

At the end of the day, we got one more chance to celebrate Josie.

– Dave Breaux, Haiti Mission Trip Leader

Paske nou pa konnen ki jou Mèt nou va vini

Tonja and I have been coming to Haiti for a while now, so much so that it almost feels like a second home when we are here. But that means that it also feels normal to us, and we sometimes miss the feeling of those first experiences. It is amazing to see the wonder in the eyes of new members who find their expectations did not even come close to the actual experience. But on Sunday, Tonja and I got to experience a first for us, we got to take communion with Pastor Marcèl’s church. That is something that is probably going to stay with us for a while.

Unfortunately, the rain cut church short. In Haiti, most people travel a good distance to get to church, and most do it on foot. Rain or shine. We are once again reminded of how often our church attendance back home goes down when the weather is bad, and we all have cars. You wonder when it was that people lost that passion that made them want to come to church like that, no matter what. In America, church is just another event to some, but in Haiti, it is so much more than that.

After church we went back to the hotel to wait for the rain to stop.

Once the rain had stopped, we got to head to Gelèe Beach.
It didn’t take the boys long to find some kids to play football with. Kids in Haiti are more likely to play soccer, but throwing a ball back and forth is universal.

Of course, there is the beach tradition of drinking coconut water. It is, apparently, an acquired taste. This being Scott’s second trip, he had definitely acquired it.

Another testament to the ingenuity of Haitians. While litter and pollution is unfortunately a big problem in Haiti, some choose to look at it in a completely different way. The ability to make do with whatever they have is one of the things I love most about Haitians. Some would see litter, this person chose to see an opportunity.

After the beach, we went back to the church to meet with the youth (young adults). We were not aware that they had planned a little competition, and we were definitely not prepared. But after they had performed a couple of songs, Bailey, Maddie, and MacKenzie stepped up and got the team started. After that, it was just singing and laughter. Word of advise, don’t ever try to take Hunter in musical chairs, he is a beast.

Toward the end, the Haitian youth performed a song in Kreyol that we recognized, and many of us were singing along in English. They asked us to sing the English version, and afterward, we all decided to sing them both together. It was a great moment, and the entire activity just reminded us that we are different, but in so many ways we are the same. One of our translators often uses the phrase “Praises go up, blessings come down”. That is definitely what was happening here today.

I have been so impressed with this team so far. In Haiti, time is considered an unlimited resource. They don’t think they can waste it, there is always more. Things seem to move at a different pace. But even for them, there are some things that are a high priority, and that is what the Pastor preached on today from Matthew 24:42-43. Paske nou pa konnen ki jou Mèt nou va vini. Because you don’t know which day your Lord is coming. Keep praying that we continue to build relationships and show God’s love as our time here grows shorter.

– Dave Breaux, Haiti Mission Trip Leader

Rainy Days – Haiti Day 1

Our trip to La Croix was mostly uneventful. Starting out in the capital city, we saw crowds of people, the mayhem of the market, the houses right on top of each other, but minimal traffic.

Slowly the throngs of people give way to the slower life of rural Haiti as we continue to head West. Less people in the street, much smaller markets, more space between homes. The team’s first look at life outside of Port-au-Prince, and the difference is hard to put into words.

For the Haitians, it is that difference that keeps so many of them in the big city. Access to markets, public transportation, etc. We start to get the picture of how convenient our own lives are. Personal vehicles, stores around every corner. Life is very different here.

 

The last couple of hours of the trip, we drove in a rain storm. And the differences are highlighted even more. Riding in the back of a pickup truck is the most popular form of public transportation, and we saw more people than we could count on the back of those “tap-taps”, covering up with anything they could. The streets that were once full of people and small roadside shops are now flooded, with little drainage available.

Another team was heading to Morency today, and our Haitian trip leader said he was not sure if they would be able to get up that road at all today. Six months ago we were not able to complete some of our projects due to lack of rain, and now too much rain is threatening to stop more of our plans.

 

We made it safely to our hotel, and were finally able to meet with the leadership council, although not all were able to make it due to the rain. They apologized that we would not be able to get out and tour the village, but the amount of rain was making the roads hard to travel on. Instead, we just sat with them and talked, asked questions, and laughed. A lot.

In so many ways we saw our differences: transportation, housing, availability of resources. But then, in just a few minutes of fellowship, we were laughing and sharing stories, and reminded once again just how alike we are as well.

– Dave Breaux, Haiti Mission Trip Leader

Revival Week 3 – Discussion Guide

Getting Started

Main Idea:
God revives the humble in heart, so those who seek revival must seek to humble themselves to God.

Discussion Starter:
What has God taught you this week during your Bible reading and prayer time?

Introduction:
This week, Pastor Micah reminded us that pride and humility are polar opposites. They can’t exist in the same place, ever. He demonstrated that when we have pride enough to hold on to our burdens (especially the burden of sin), it will weary us.  And when we have the humility to admit our weakness and need, God will give us rest.

Watch this brief intro together with your group (click picture below):


Encounter God

Primary Scriptures: 1 Peter 5:5-7, Proverbs 3:34, Psalm 55:22, Isaiah 57:15, Matthew 11:28-30, Ephesians 2:8-9

Discussion Questions:

  1. Why would God dislike pride at all?
  2. In several of the passages, God talks about giving things to people (as opposed to them earning or deserving something).  How could pride (or humility) affect someone’s ability to receive a gift?
  3. How is it that the most loving thing that God can do to a proud person is… resist them?  
  4. Re-read Isaiah 57:15.  What does revival have to do with someone’s grief over their own sin (that is, “contrition”)?

Discovery Bible Method:
For deeper study, as an alternative to the questions above, read 1 Peter 5:1-7 and use the Discovery Bible Method to explore the passage.


Embrace Others

Suggestion: Consider breaking the group into dyads or triads for this section.

Getting to know you:  Can you think of a time that God gave you grace? Can you think of a time that God resisted you? Additionally, who is into being both raw and real tonight? (Seriously. This is hard to share, but…remember that bit in 1 Peter 5:5? This is part of being clothed with humility.)

Getting to know them:  Humility has a lot to do with approachability. What’s something you could say to your mini-group that would make you more approachable?

Getting to know Him:  In Isaiah, God says that He doesn’t just inhabit eternity, but that He hangs out with those who are “contrite”, i.e., appropriately grieved by their sin.  Every time you pray this week, just make a mental note about how you feel about your sin and how revived you feel. See if you can spot a relationship.


Engage the World Around Us

Engaging at Faith Promise:  Submit yourself to fellow Christ-trusters. That is, take care of each other, and be gentle about it.

Engaging in Community:  Be approachable by being humble. That’s going to matter during the Halloween season.  However you celebrate (or don’t), the most important thing for your neighborhood is that they know you care about everyone’s well-being.

Engaging the World:  Pray for Christ’s missionaries to not be discouraged. Scripture is clear that our prayers matter for those in dangerous places.  


Expand God’s Kingdom

Can you think of anyone who might need to hear that God is clear about His stance on pride and humility?  Or might want to talk about it?


Leader’s Notes

ALL groups at Faith Promise should follow Jesus Christ and lead others to do the same. Below are the marks of a growing follower and disciple of Jesus.

– A follower of Jesus desires to encounter God through the deeper study and application of God’s Word.

– A follower of Jesus embraces people and values relationships on a deeper level so everyone can grow together.

– A follower of Jesus engages and serves the world around them and in their community, through local partners or God-directed opportunities.

– A follower of Jesus expands God’s Kingdom through development and multiplication of disciple-makers, possibly to lead more groups at Faith Promise.